Friday, June 6, 2014

Why Every Article On LinkedIn Is Good

Posted Via LinkedIn on June 6, 2014:
Have you written a comment on someone'e article posted via LinkedIn before? If so, have you stopped to consider the effort put into that article prior to calling it a 'name' or going way beyond constructive criticism to attack their professional credentials and/or experience level? If so, I wrote this article for YOU, mostly. I also hope my words inspire and fuel writers to take the stage because they have the right to write.
I offer three reasons that every article on LinkedIn is good:
1. Writing is good. It is good for the person writing. It is also good for anyone who enjoys reading it. If you beg to differ, please first visit this web page (which also has great tips on writing skills.)
2. Professionally networking via shared writing and experiences will aid in the growth for all via LinkedIn (thanks by the way!) Growth is good, no?
Did you consider your comments could stunt that growth for another professional? Please read how important LinkedIn is for professionals at:
3. This is the biggest one..... people are trying to have their voice heard and that is so good.
In a world where no one has their own consistent stage, and in many cases we are forced to use technology to communicate professionally. Isn't it good to read a unique perspective or hear the other side?
What will our world be if there is no place to professionally and comfortably speak your mind?
So, you wonder who I am and what I do, great! The point of this post is not to draw attention to me. There are two groups of people that need to take professional notice to this post:
#1 - The Haters: You know who you are and you have been looking for a typo this entire time. I hope you find it and you can move on to finding fault elsewhere. But first, I am honestly curious, Have you ever tried to agree with someone you didn't believe or trust? Its a life-changing experience. Please consider someone's heart exposed prior to posting a comment because when you publish your own words that is what it feels like. Please at least see the link below for constructive critique techniques if you don't plan on reading any further. Lastly, if you demean a writer via a comment, beware... If I find your comment I will likely defend the writer even if I don't agree with their post. It is their right to write and professionally respectful to refrain from replying with demeaning or degrading comments.
#2 - The Writers/Publishers: Keep being you. Obviously LinkedIn is a professional networking platform and I feel that within that spectrum there is all the room in the world for your experiences (PG) and your feelings relating to professional environment, culture, or any other pertinent topic for that matter. I have been so impressed with the effort and thought put into articles on this site that I look forward to what YOU publish on LinkedIn every day. The creativity and real-life examples can only come from you. If you run into a comment on your post that is difficult to swallow, find a way to agree with them or at least thank them for their feedback, it will make the situation better. Turning the other cheek breeds a different view for all.
If you read my article this far it means I got up the nerve to publish for the first time on LinkedIn and I want to personally thank you for reading this. 
I strongly advise constructive criticism, in fact I worship it. There is a professional way to go about this that does not include demeaning the writer. If you are unsure about how to word things in this manner, See this article:
This constructive feedback is a gold mine for growth. Therefore, I look forward to your comments. Every single one. Give others the 'Thumbs Up' because writing is good.
Elizabeth Dehn
Disclaimer: I do NOT work for LinkedIn(although I would), so every opinion expressed in this post was my own regarding the do's and don'ts of this professional networking site. Thanks!


  1. Elizabeth, I really enjoyed reading your article. The message is clear and well-supported by your ideas. For your hostile audience, it encourages them to reflect on their own actions toward others. I applaud your effort and hope others have the chance to read your article.

    1. Hi Leah!
      Thank you so much for your insightful feedback. I appreciate you reading my article. Your compliments carry the weight of your own amazing skills and integrity, meaning more than words.
      I look forward to our LeanIn Mpls meeting soon!
      Elizabeth Dehn